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  • Raynecia Hebert

How to Make Money as a Flow Artist

Do you enjoy the way flowing makes you feel? Is it something that you often wonder how you can make a living from? I know it did for me and quite a few other flow artists who have found themselves making a pretty decent income as an entertainer or instructor.


First, I’m going to let you in on a little secret. You don’t have to be the most advanced hooper or super sales savvy poi spinner. In fact, all it takes to succeed is a bit of hustle, an open mind, strategy and some thick skin.


Would you believe it if I told you that I joined my first entertainment company with under a year of experience at just 20 years old? Or that I had my first sponsorship deal before I was 25? I performed at warehouse events, night clubs, lounges and festivals around Las Vegas, NV and California.


Keep reading to find out how you can turn your passion as a flow artist into a livable career.



Online Monetization

Flow artists of all backgrounds can usually be found online. If you don’t have a website, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest or Tik Tok, then I suggest that you hop on one or all of these platforms. Online monetizing is nothing new but how you engage and spend your time online can either assist or hinder your business. Some of these platforms allow the user to collaborate with other businesses and flow artists. Instagram, Facebook and YouTube present solid opportunities to get paid per view or based on your audience interactions. Instagram for example recently launched a section in the business portal that allows qualified accounts to sell and make commission from users who purchase directly from their page. Think flow artist clothing brands and flow props that you already tag and lead people to anyways. If you can generate some extra revenue from it, then why not give one of both of these platforms a try? It’s like being an affiliate for some of your favorite fashion brands without needing a special code. If fashion is something that you express daily online along with your flow art, then this is a great way to make some side money. You can also post tutorials, tips, highlights from a performance/gig or other engaging content that your followers love to see from you.


Sponsorships

Sponsorships are a great way to stand out. It displays to other brands and clients that you’re not only qualified but that you also take your business seriously. It showcases that you know how to maintain a positive brand to partner relationship(s). This is also another great way to keep your flow props/equipment, performance gear and marketing costs low. This is also another great way to gain exposure and an opportunity to grow with a company. Some individuals also get brand sponsored posts, videos, reels, etc. This is when the brand pays you to advertise a certain product to your viewers in hopes that you’ll be able to drive in sales or leads.


Freelance/ Pitch your Skills

Is there a local bar, nightclub, lounge, or First Friday event that you’ve scoped out and can tell they could use a performance artist or flow art workshop? Why not try to pitch yourself or your/business? Create a resume or media kit and either show up in person or send an email. Persistence and positive energy is key when it comes to this one. You have to be willing to form new relationships and get a little out of your comfort zone. Before approaching an establishment make sure that you’ve researched the venue, the demographic, if they even have enough space for a flow artist to perform.


Busking

Have you ever seen a vibrant street performer giving a show in public with something to collect money in? That is who a busker is. This is a fun and interesting way to make an income. If you don’t already live in a city where this is popular than consider relocating even if it’s just for the weekend. Unfortunately, busking isn’t usually the most lucrative career path to choose. On the contrary it is not something that will go out of style anytime soon. So give it a try if you haven’t yet. Some major cities do require a license to busk in certain high pedestrian traffic areas (think Vegas or Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco).


Join a Troupe/Entertainment Company

This one may be a no-brainer but it’s definitely easier said than done. Most troupes and companies hold yearly auditions (with exceptions). Auditioning and performing for these types of groups will oftentimes involve travel, hotel, and food expenses. Unless you live in the city where one of these groups is an option, you will most likely need to invest in yourself for travel or relocate. Both of these things require a certain lifestyle. This is, of course, difficult for many to keep up with - especially if you’re one to get married, have kids, etc.


All things listed above take hard work. When I say work, I mean months to years of dedication and grind. However, please don’t let that scare you. It is not impossible to have the life you dreamt of. It is not far fetched to make a livable income within your flow arts business or as an artist period. Accept that you’re always growing and learn to charge what your talent is worth. The sky is truly the limit!

If you are interested in learning a bit more or have any questions feel free to reach out on social media or via email. If you’re interested in collaborating or have an idea, I’d love to hear that as well.


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